Houston D. Ruck is creative director for Growth Energy. In this role, Houston manages branding, online presence and national advertising campaigns for print, digital and broadcast mediums. Prior to Growth Energy he was a designer with U.S. News & World Report where he led production of visuals for the magazine’s award-winning website. Previously, Houston was a print designer for the magazine’s Money & Business section after starting his career as a photo and graphics editor at Stars & Stripes, the daily newspaper for military families based overseas. His work as a student with The Vanderbilt Hustler and Commodore Yearbook has been recognized by the Associated Collegiate Press’s “Best in Show” national conference competition and College Media Advisor’s “Best of Collegiate Design” annual. He is an American & Southern Studies graduate of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.

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There's no link between the Renewable Fuel Standard and increased land usage, and no link to increased risk to endangered species. What there is a link to is lower emissions — a reduction of 589 million metric tons over the first decade of implementation. https://t.co/FNo7vKolET

via @GrowthEnergy

Thank you to @SenAmyKlobuchar, @SenStabenow, @SenatorDurbin, @RonWyden, @SenDuckworth, @SenSherrodBrown, @SenatorBennet, @maziehirono, and @SenTinaSmith for supporting our industry, and for working to ensure that @EPA gets its biofuels fix right! klobuchar.senate.gov/public/index.c…

via @GrowthEnergy

"In the absence of a causal link between the RFS and land use change―and in particular land conversion from grassland, wetland, or forest to corn and soy―there can be no causal link between the RFS and impacts to terrestrial species due to loss or degradation of habitat.”

via @GrowthEnergy

A claim is going around that the RFS puts endangered species at risk, and one of its fundamental flaws is it hinges on the false notion that we're using more cropland for food, livestock feed, and biofuels. As we've established, this just isn't true. growthenergy.org/2019/12/04/rep…

via @GrowthEnergy