WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) released an independent analysis that shows how ethanol is projected to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) by up to 70 percent in 2022.

Growth Energy welcomed the report findings, and CEO Emily Skor issued the following statement:

“This new USDA study further supports that ethanol is a win-win for all Americans,” said Skor. “Higher ethanol blends provide not only tremendous health and environmental benefits, but economic benefits as well for rural America and our farmers. Our industry remains committed to cleaner fuel options for all drivers, and ethanol’s role in reducing GHGs is among the reasons why. We look forward to drivers experiencing these benefits and more when they soon have access to E15 year-round.”

Read the new study on ethanol and greenhouse gas effects here.

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There's no link between the Renewable Fuel Standard and increased land usage, and no link to increased risk to endangered species. What there is a link to is lower emissions — a reduction of 589 million metric tons over the first decade of implementation. https://t.co/FNo7vKolET

via @GrowthEnergy

Thank you to @SenAmyKlobuchar, @SenStabenow, @SenatorDurbin, @RonWyden, @SenDuckworth, @SenSherrodBrown, @SenatorBennet, @maziehirono, and @SenTinaSmith for supporting our industry, and for working to ensure that @EPA gets its biofuels fix right! klobuchar.senate.gov/public/index.c…

via @GrowthEnergy

"In the absence of a causal link between the RFS and land use change―and in particular land conversion from grassland, wetland, or forest to corn and soy―there can be no causal link between the RFS and impacts to terrestrial species due to loss or degradation of habitat.”

via @GrowthEnergy

A claim is going around that the RFS puts endangered species at risk, and one of its fundamental flaws is it hinges on the false notion that we're using more cropland for food, livestock feed, and biofuels. As we've established, this just isn't true. growthenergy.org/2019/12/04/rep…

via @GrowthEnergy