Kyle Gilley joined POET in July 2012 and is the senior vice president of External Affairs and Communications. Gilley is responsible for developing policy, public affairs, and communications strategies and managing resources that advance the business objectives of POET and the renewable fuels industry. Prior to joining POET, Gilley held public policy and business development positions for Lennox International, Inc., in Richardson, TX; in April 2007, he was promoted to the vice president of Government Affairs. Before joining Lennox, Gilley worked for the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce and Baylor University. He currently serves as a board member of Growth Energy, a leading voice for U.S. ethanol supporters. Gilley is also involved with Fuels America and America’s Renewable Future efforts in Iowa. In addition, he serves on the board of directors for POET Biorefining – Corning and POET Biorefining – Ashton. Gilley received his Bachelor of Business Administration, Management from Baylor University. He previously served as a board member for the Baylor Alumni Association.

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There's no link between the Renewable Fuel Standard and increased land usage, and no link to increased risk to endangered species. What there is a link to is lower emissions — a reduction of 589 million metric tons over the first decade of implementation. https://t.co/FNo7vKolET

via @GrowthEnergy

Thank you to @SenAmyKlobuchar, @SenStabenow, @SenatorDurbin, @RonWyden, @SenDuckworth, @SenSherrodBrown, @SenatorBennet, @maziehirono, and @SenTinaSmith for supporting our industry, and for working to ensure that @EPA gets its biofuels fix right! klobuchar.senate.gov/public/index.c…

via @GrowthEnergy

"In the absence of a causal link between the RFS and land use change―and in particular land conversion from grassland, wetland, or forest to corn and soy―there can be no causal link between the RFS and impacts to terrestrial species due to loss or degradation of habitat.”

via @GrowthEnergy

A claim is going around that the RFS puts endangered species at risk, and one of its fundamental flaws is it hinges on the false notion that we're using more cropland for food, livestock feed, and biofuels. As we've established, this just isn't true. growthenergy.org/2019/12/04/rep…

via @GrowthEnergy